Sunday, 25 June 2017

USE IT UP

 


There was a mantra in World War II:

       Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.   These were desperate times for many and there were shortages of basic goods during the depression, during the war and for many years after.   If you read articles, books or records of the time you can't help but be impressed with people's ingenuity and resourcefulness.   Does it take a crisis to bring this out in people?






Let's look at the first part of the phrase:   Use it up.   When I read that 40% of food goes uneaten here (this is an American article) it seems appalling to me.   Where does that 40% go?   Many places it seems.  There are losses in the farming process, in harvesting, packing and distributing.   We all know about losses in retail which at least provides something for those inclined to dumpster dive.  Then there are losses in restaurants and losses at home.   A lot of food is wasted but perhaps since it now goes into the organic waste container under the sink and is picked up with the garbage pick up by many cities, we feel better about it.   Do they turn it into fertilizer, we wonder?

At least with clothing we can donate what we no longer want to charities.  They are overflowing with our discards but some are difficult to make a profit from.  How much would you pay for a used T shirt that cost $3 new?    Those that remain unsold are shipped in bulk to countries in Africa where they undermine the local clothing manufacturers.

Do you use up your appliances?   Warranties have shrunk to minuscule levels over the years and a 3 month warranty is about all you will get without purchasing extra coverage.   The average lifespan of a large appliance seems to have been shrinking and replacement after five or six years doesn't seem unusual.   People will repair the appliance once except that repair costs can mean that it won't be done a second time.    The unwanted hulk is transported to the dump where it will rest indefinitely.

I have an old chair that my parents brought over from the Old Country when they immigrated sixty years ago.   People used to ship over their belongs it seems.   I've have it re-upholstered twice and the craftsperson remarked on the quality of the curved wood back.   I don't think I could ever use it up and I don't really want to.



Next time:   Wear it out!

2 comments:

  1. Appliances, grrr! I think you're right. Appliances used to last longer before even needing the first repair. Our first vacuum lasted 20 years or more before it burned out. Our first stove was 30 years old and still going, same with the furnace. In this newer house, our microwave, juicer, clothes dryer, stove, refrigerator, and furnace have all broken down and needed repaired or replaced, and the oldest of all those appliances was 12 years. The rest were younger. I get a little angry about it because I would pay more for longer lasting, better quality, less waste appliances.
    Kira, I bet your parents' old chair is lovely!

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    1. Younger people seem to accept the disposability/short lifespan of items with little surprise but if you've lived long enough you remember a time when things were different.

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